Film Seizure At the Movies – Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

On this edition of Film Seizure At the Movies, Geoff and Jason are joined by Chuck Moore as they discuss the 9th film from Quentin Tarantino – Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.

WARNING: SPOILERS ARE DISCUSSED in this review!

6 comments

  1. This is the only piece I can find that comes close to addressing your nitpick, which is nicely specific. Most are just covering the “How’d they do that?” angle, or making generic cultural appropriation accusations, which are usually spurious anyway, and miss the better point this time (yours). This one doesn’t state your complaint, but still offers a perspective on why this Lee might’ve been the way he was. It’s not much, though.

    https://www.polygon.com/2019/7/29/8932193/once-upon-a-time-in-hollywood-bruce-lee-tarantino

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  2. Thanks for that, Dave. Jason here. I still think QT has something to answer for. While I admittedly didn’t realize the significant chip and arrogance Lee carried (this is a good article I found later: http://mentalfloss.com/article/67108/time-bruce-lee-was-challenged-real-fight) nearly everyone who knew Lee and commented on the scene has mentioned the enormous amount of respect he had for Cassius Clay and that he would never had said he would “cripple him”. Of course much of this could be viewing a legend via rose colored glasses, but when you have Lee’s own daughter and protege distressed by the portrayal, it’s worth taking the filmmaker to task.

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    1. Yup! You sound right, so far. As I think i said above, not many are even spotting the issue you did, so he’s not saying much about it. I know not much about the man myself, but still, as soon as you described the scene, I thought, “Whaaaaa…t? That seems off.” Not that he’d lose the fight, but his personality. So far you’ve seen *everything* I have that even approaches your concern. I’ll keep posting if I find anything, but I don’t think much more will come. It’s odd that it’s not a topic.

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  3. I enjoyed your podcast, it was the first one I’ve tuned in to listen. I will offer another perspective on this movie, which I have already viewed. I was alive and aware of the historical events used to loosely base it. Think of the year, 1969. Two other major events dominated the news. Obviously the moon landing was tops. Then in the summer there was Woodstock. No, I wasn’t there. If I’m a guest on your show I’m starting out by pushing the soundtrack. Some of the best radio rock and roll, R&B of the era was featured. My generation will love it, as will my daughters. Next, you spend a lot of time discussing feet, and what you see as the director’s obsession with them. When I first saw Sharon Tate’s feet propped up, it reminded me of my days working in EMS. We just called it TDF (terminally dirty feet) and let it go at that. I appreciated that the director took a horrific episode and gave it a fantasy happy ending.
    I saw the Dalton character as a combo of Steve McQueen and Clint Eastwood. His story is one of a man seeking redemption and renewal in a changing industry. The little girl actress was a kind of Jiminy Cricket. Lastly, anytime a martial artist gets his butt kicked I will applaud.
    Thanks for your time.

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